Making Plans When You Can’t Make Plans

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What’s your next move? The fear of the unknown plagues us during these trying times. Many are left asking, “What exactly is the new normal?” Perhaps the better question is, what is my new normal?

As the days, weeks, and months go by its important to try and formulate some kind of plan. It’s time to make your own roadmap to get through the dark days of corona. Although accurate prediction is difficult or even impossible, you can still come up with several strategies for what if scenarios. Find a quiet space, grab a pencil and paper. Try to plan for the next year.

Steps to Follow:

  1. Write out each month leaving enough space to jot down goals.
  2. Think quietly and ponder over the needs of yourself and your family.
  3. Consider key months as you reflect over the year. (For example, August is back to school. What is the plan if the children go back to school vs. if they don’t? November/December will we visit family or take a trip? If so, how much is needed?)
  4. Think about how corona has changed your life and the lessons learned.
  5. Get to Work! Write down three specific, obtainable goals for each month.

As you began to work on your plan, try to choose a goal from different domains of life. In general, there are eight different wellness domains: spiritual, social, personal, emotional, environmental, cultural, intellectual, and community. Therefore, you are creating your own wellness plan!

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Certain goals for some months may only be geared towards your children. Another month you may plan a few for yourself from different domains. As your planning, always consider how to save and set money aside. Try to gauge what your new normal is, and how to bounce back.

If you have lost a business, though it hurts, you can rebuild. Perhaps you’ve already experienced one major traumatic experience and this pandemic is bringing about more trauma. Find all the positive in your life. You may even find it encouraging to write down three positive things about your life each day to “look at the glass half full.” Also, it’s okay to seek help from a medical professional. It is okay to get in the car line to obtain free food. Although it may be humbling to ask for food, making sure your family is taking care of is your priority. There is no shame in doing what you must do to provide. The new normal for each family will look and feel different. Do not measure yourself against other families. Stay focused on your own plan and journey.

Mira Cassidy

Author, Journalist, and Motivational Speaker

Speaking Topics include: Breaking Free from Interpersonal Abuse, Overcoming Adverse Childhood Experience, Breaking Toxic Cycles, Maintaining Health and Wellness

Email miracassidy@gmail.com and visit miracassidy.com

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Mira Cassidy is an Indianapolis author, journalist, and motivational speaker who from a young age found peace and serenity in writing. A love for the art form blossomed in 2015 when she went back to complete her degree after an eleven-year hiatus. There she took additional English and creative writing courses. During those semesters the depth of her creativity was unlocked, and she produced some of her first short stories and additional poems. As a teen she received the opportunity to continue her studies in Telecommunications via the local Youth Video Institute where she developed a foundation in video production, directing, editing, and journalism. This experience allowed her to interview and meet many individuals from different walks of life including a very young Nick Cannon, David Hollister, and Suzanne Taylor. Today, Mira is a very busy and devoted mother of three. She uses her voice to raise awareness to the pain and suffering caused by domestic violence, adverse childhood experiences, and destructive cycles. Also, she advocates for more funding and focus to be brought into area schools to service children who are exceptional learners.

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